Skip to main content

Full text of "Receipts and expenditures of the Town of Somersworth for the year ending ."

See other formats





j ^SOMERS WORTH U 




^S4 



New 



Hampshire 




Annual Report L^ 
2000-2001 ^^ 









d-GO\ 



^. 



^^ 



pWflllllUI 



a 



H 



V 



New 
Hampsliire 




Annual Report L^ 
2000^2001 













m 



TABLE OF CONTENT 



City Officials 4-5 

Detail Schedule of Revenues & Other Financing Sources 
Budget & Actual General Fund - Schedule A-1 35 

Detail Schedule of Expenditures and Other Financing Uses 
Budget and Actual General Fund - Schedule A-2 36-37 

Development Services 30-34 

Enterprise Funds - Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenses, 
Budget & Actual - Schedule E-3 38-39 

Fire Department 11-14 

Forest Glade Cemetery / Bulky Waste / Adopt-A-Spot 26 

Housing Authority 21-23 

Library 27-29 

Ordinances 2000/2001 6 

Police Department 15-17 

Pumpkin Festival Photos 40 

Recreation Department 1 8 - 20 

Resolutions 2000/2001 7-10 

Welfare Department 24-25 



CITY OFFICIAL 



Mayor 

James M. McLin 
Term Exp. Jan. 2002 

City Manager 

Douglas R. Elliott, Jr. 

Councilor Ward 1 

William Guilmette 
Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Councilor Ward 2 

Roger Gagne 
Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Councilor Ward 3 

Mike Micucci 
Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Councilor Ward 4 

Stephen Fournier, resigned 
William Boulanger, replaced 
Dana Milliard, replaced 
Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Councilor Ward 5 

Romeo Messier 
Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Councilors At Large 

Brian Tapscott 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 
David Littletield, resigned 
Sherie Dinger, replaced 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 
Roger Berube 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 
Arvid Wiggin 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 

Assessor 

Shirley White 

Code Enforcement Officer 

Carroll Seigars 

City Clerk 

Nancy A. Liebson 

Clerk of Court 

Jean M. Flayhan 

District Court Judge 

Clyde R. Coolidge 

Special Justice 

Stephen H. Roberts 



Fire Chief 

Paul Vallee 

Police Chief 

Dean Crombie 

Welfare Director 

Owen Eriey 

City Engineer 

David Foster 

City Attorney 

Coolidge Prof. Assn. 

Director of Public Works 

John Jackman 

Tax Collector 

Margaret Wagner 

Director of Finance 
and Administration 

James Lane 

Director of Development 
Services 

Robert Belmore 

City Planner 

James Steffen 

Assessors 

Term 3 Years 
Irving Liebson 

Term Exp. March 2001 
James Cowan 

Term Exp. March 2002 

Board of Adjustment 

Term 3 Years 
Ronald LeHoullier 

Term Exp. July 28, 2004 
Sam Reid 

Term Exp. Feb. 7, 2003 
Stacy Hall 

Term Exp. July 28, 2002 
Michael Smith 

Term Exp. July 28, 2004 
Steven Stout 

Term Exp. May, 2003 
Harvy Irwin 
Term Exp. Jan. 2005 



Planning Board 

Douglas R. Elliott, Jr. 

City Manager 
David Foster 

City Engineer 
Roger Berube 

City Councilor 
Term 3 years 
Larry Masse 

Term Exp. March 2004 
Francis Vincent 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Martin Dumont 

Term Exp. March 2004 
Ronald LeHoullier 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Alan Marquis 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Sherie Dinger, resigned 
Paul Robidas, replaced 
Term Exp. March 2003 

Traffic Safety Committee 

David Foster, City Engineer 
Daniel Gagne 
Paul Vallee, Fire Chief 
John Jackman, 

Dir. of Public Works 
Romeo Messier, Councilor 
Jamie Steffen, Planner 
Paul Robidas 
Duane Ford, SAU 56 

Personnel Advisory Board 

Term 3 Years 
John Meserve 
David Melanson 
Roderick Boivin 

Trustee of Trust Funds 

Term 3 Years 
Kevin Ferland 

Term Exp. Jan. 2003 
Vivianne Derosier 

Term Exp. Jan. 2004 
Roderick Boivin 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 

Somersworth Housing 
Authority 

Term 5 Years 
David Roberge 

Term Exp. Feb. 2005 
George Bald 

Term Exp. Feb. 2006 



Jean Gill 

Term Exp. Feb. 2002 
Teresa Johanson 

Term Exp. Feb. 2003 
Joan Lynch 

Term Exp. Feb. 2004 

Water Commissioners 

Douglas R. Elliott, Jr., Ch. 
David Foster 
Romeo Messier 

Term Exp. Jan. 2004 
John Chick 

Term Exp. Jan. 2004 

Conservation Commission 

Term 3 Years 
Brian McKay 

Term Exp. Mar. 2004 
Raymond Boulanger, resigned 

Term Exp. Mar. 2003 
Frank Richardson 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Imants Millers 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Scott Gessis 

Term Exp. March 2003 
Peter Eldridge 

Term Exp. March 2003 
Barbara Flynn 

Term Exp. March 2003 

Cemetery Trustees 

Term 5 Years 
Kathy Walsh 

Term Exp. Jan. 2004 
Stanley Merrill 

Term Exp. Jan. 2003 
David Eastman 

Term Exp. Jan. 2007 
Phil Wentworth 

Term Exp. Jan. 2006 
Charles Kennedy 

Term Exp. Feb. 2005 

Library Trustees 

Term 5 Years 
Pam Landry, resigned 
Marion Crombie, replaced 
Pamela Stuart 

Term Exp. Jan. 2004 
Joan McNally 

Term Exp. Jan. 2002 
Thomas Tetreault 

Term Exp. Jan. 2006 
Ellen Dozier 

Term Exp. Jan. 2005 
Librarian: Debora Longo 



School Board 

Terms Exp. Jan. 2004 

Ward1 

Leroy Nash 

Ward 2 

Clair Snyder 
Ward 3 

Roland Dumont 
Ward 4 

Alan Schlemmer 

Wards 

Denis Messier 

At Large 

Terms Exp. Jan. 2002 
Matt Keiser 
Mark Richardson 
Nancie Cameron, resigned 
James Cowan, replaced 
Michael Watman 

Fair Hearing Board 

Raymond Roberge 
Term Exp. June 1998 

Ralph Pope 
Term Exp. June 1999 

Samuel Reid 
Term Exp. August 1997 

Historic District Commission 

Sally Goodwin 

Term Exp. March 2003 
John Jackman 

Term Exp. March 2003 
Monica Zulauf 

Term Exp. March 2002 
Daniel Vincent 

Term Exp. May 2003 
Beth Poulin 

Term Exp. June 2003 
Catherine Pritchett 

Term Exp. Jan. 2000 
Roger Berube, Ex Officio 

Election Officials 

Terms Exp. Jan. 2000 
Wardi 
Moderator: 

Richard Heon 
Ward Clerk: 

Henriette Guilmette 
Selectmen: 

Fernande Bourque 

Marjorie Goldberg 

Virginia Gorman 



Ward 2 
Moderator: 

Arthur Pilley, resigned 

William LaBonte replaced & re- 
signed 

Arnold Kretschmar, replaced 
Ward Clerk: 

Connie Kretschmar 
Selectmen: 

Pauline Labonte 

Jack Labonte 

Rita Sullivan 

Ward 3 
Moderator: 

John Meserve 
Ward Clerk: 

Donald Gelinas 
Selectmen: 

Martin Dumont 
Jeanne Ambrose 
Dorothy Gauvin 

Ward 4 

Moderator: 

Michael Browning, resigned 

Vacant 
Ward Clerk: 

Lucille Frechette 
Selectmen: 

Lillian Roberge 

Helen Demers 

Vacant Position 

Wards 
Moderator: 

Joanne Demers 

Ward Clerk: 

Cheryl Gagnon 

Selectmen: 

Vacant Position 
Mary Dumais 
Marie Ange Dumais 

Supervisor of Checklist 

Term 5 Years 
Nancie Cameron 

Term Exp. Sept. 2005 
Janet Gagne 

Term Exp. Sept. 2002 
Antoinette Harvey 

Term Exp. May, 2005 
Vacant Position 
Raymond LaPointe 

Term Exp. Sept. 2003 



2000/2001 ORDINANCES 

/ 

1. Ordinance No. 1-01 Zoning Ordinance Amendment - Table 4.A.5 Mini 
Warehouses. 8/14/00. 

2. Ordinance No. 2-01 Zoning Ordinance Amendment - Section 9 
Manufactured Housing District. 8/14/00. 

3. Ordinance No. 3-01 Zoning Map Amendment, Manufactured Housing 
District. 9/5/00. 

4. Ordinance No. 4-01 Amending Chapter 13 Police offenses. 9/5/00. 

5. Ordinance No. 5-01 Amendment to Chapter 13, Police Offenses, 
Section 3.1 Snow Emergency. 10/2/00. 

6. Ordinance No. 6-01 Zoning Ordinance Amendment - Section 12, 
Flood Plain District. 12/11/00. 

7. Ordinance No. 7-01 Zoning Ordinance Amendments: Manufactured 
Housing. 3/19/01. 

8. Ordinance No. 8-01 Transfer Between Departments. 3/19/01. 

9. Ordinance No. 9-01 Amending Chapter 13 Police Offenses. 5/7/01 . 

10. Ordinance No. 10-01 Amending Chapter 30, Section 8. 5/7/01. 

11. Ordinance No. 11-01 Zoning Ordinance and Map Amendments 
Hilltop Zoning Districts. 5/21/01. 

12. Ordinance No. 12-01 New Chapter 11 A - Dumpsters. 5/21/01. 

13. Ordinance No. 13-01 Amendments to Chapter 29 - Administrative 
Code. 5/21 /01 . 

14. Ordinance No. 14-01 FY 2001/2002 Budget. 5/29/01. 

15. Ordinance No. 15-01 Amendment to Chapter 12 - Streets and 
Sidewalks. 6/18/01. 

16. Ordinance No. 16-01 Amending Chapter 4 Personnel Rules and 
Regulations. 6/18/01. 

17. Ordinance No. 17-01 Transfer Between Program Areas. 6/18/01. 

18. Ordinance No. 2-02 Amending Chapter 13 - Police Offenses, Section 
3.4.D Weight Limits. 10/1/O1. 



1 . Resolution No. 1 -01 Authorizing the City Manager to Receive and Sign 
Architectural and Engineering Proposals and Contracts for the 
Construction of a New City Hall. 7/ 17/00. 

2. Resolution No. 4-01 Supporting the Exploration of a Somersworth 
Location for the New District Court Building. 8/14/00. 

3. Resolution No. 5-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
with John L. Lyman for the Replacement of Sidewalks on High Street. 
8/14/00. 

4. Resolution No. 6-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Complete 
Replacement of Sidewalks on the West Side of High Street from Home 
to Pearl Streets. 8/14/00. 

5. Resolution No. 7-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a Lease 
Purchase Agreement for a One Ton 4WD with Dump and 9 ft. Plow. 
9/18/00. 

6. Resolution No. 8-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a Lease 
Purchase Agreement for a Plow and Dump Truck Setup with Wing and 
Sander. 9/18/00. 

7. Resolution No. 9-01 Bond for the Renovation of 3 Elm Street into the 
New City Hall. 10/16/00. 

8. Resolution No. 10-01 Bond for the Fagade Renovation and Parking 
Lot Improvements to the Somersworth Plaza. 10/16/00. 

9. Resolution No. 11-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign an 
Architectural and Engineering Contract for the Fagade Renovation for 
the Somersworth Plaza. 10/ 16/00. 

10. Resolution No. 12-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Purchase Tax 
Collection and Accounting Software. 10/16/00. 

11. Resolution No. 13-01 on Proposed Brick Street. 11/20/00. 

12. Resolution No. 14-01 Bond for City's Share of Remedial Action Costs 
in Connection with the Closing of the City's Landfill. 1/2/01 . 

13. Resolution No. 15-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Enter Into a 
Land Lease with Ocean Bank. 1/2/01 . 

14. Resolution No. 16-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Enter Into a 
Land Lease with Wentworth Douglass Hospital. 1/2/01. 



15. Resolution No. 18-01 Authorizing the City Manager to File an 
Application for a Loan re Upgrade of Wastewater Treatment Facilities. 
2/5/01. 

16. Resolution No. 19-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a 
Contract for Engineering Services for the Design and Construction 
Management of the Two Wastewater Pump Stations. 2/5/01 . 

17. Resolution No. 20-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a 
Contract for Engineering Services for the Design and Construction 
Management of Dewatering and Sludge Disposal System for the 
Wastewater Facility. 2/5/01. 

18. Resolution No. 21-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a 
Contract for Engineering Services for the Facility Study of the 
Wastewater Facility to Meet our New Permit Requirements and Future 
Needs. 2/5/01. 

19. Resolution No. 22-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Receive Bids for 
the Resurfacing of Certain Streets. 2/20/01 . 

20. Resolution No. 23-01 Amendment to the Triangle Urban Renewal 
Project Development Plan. 2/20/01. 

21. Resolution No. 24-01 Reaffirming Support for the Expansion of Legal 
Gambling in the State of N.H. 2/20/01 . 

22. Resolution No. 26-01 Authorizing the Director of Public Works & 
Utilities to Negotiate and Accept Grant Funds for a Household 
Hazardous Waste Collection Program. 3/7/01. 

23. Resolution No. 25-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Submit a Land 
& Water Conservation Fund Program. 3/19/01 . 

24. Resolution No. 27-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
for Renovation of the Citizens Bank Building for City Hall. 4/16/01 . 

25. Resolution No. 28-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
for the Somersworth Plaza Renovations. 4/16/01 . 

26. Resolution No. 29-01 Supporting Submission of N.H. Land and 
Community Heritage Investment Program Grant Application. 4/16/01. 

27. Resolution No. 30-01 Supporting Bond for the Renovation of 3 Elm 
Street Into the New City Hall. 4/1 6/01 . 

28. Resolution No. 33-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
with Elf's Landscaping for Grounds Maintenance. 4/16/01 . 



29. Resolution No. 31-01 Federal Emergency Management Agency 
Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program - Pumper. 5/7/01 . 

30. Resolution No. 32-01 Federal Emergency Management Agency 
Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program - Radios. 5/7/01. 

31. Resolution No. 36-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Three- 
Year Lease Agreement with TTLC. 5/7/01 . 

32. Resolution No. 34-01 For Order of Charter Amendment - Technical 
Revisions. 5/21/01. 

33. Resolution No. 35-01 For Order of Charter Amendment - Abolish 
Water Commission. 5/21/01 . 

34. Resolution No. 37-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Select a 
Designee to Sit on Planning Board. 5/21/01 . 

35. Resolution No. 38-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
for Resurfacing Certain Streets. 5/21/01. 

36. Resolution No. 39-01 Authorizing the City Manager to Accept Funds 
and Enter Into a Contract with NH Department of Enviromental 
Services for the Estuaries Grant. 5/21 /01 . 

37. Resolution No. 40-01 City of Somersworth Community Development 
Block Grant. 6/4/01. 

38. Resolution No. 1-02 Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a Lease 
Purchase Agreement for a Replacement Fire Pumper. 9/4/01 

39. Resolution No. 4-02 Real Property Revaluation Update. 9/4/01. 

40. Resolution No. 5-02 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Lease 
Purchase Agreement for the Replacement of a Dump Truck with Plow. 
9/4/01. 

41. Resolution No. 6-02 Issuance of Tax Warrant for Costs Incurred from 
Violation of Property Maintenance Code from Cease and Desist 
Orders Against Sherry L. Allman. 9/1 7/01 . 

42. Resolution No. 7-02 Supporting the Efforts of the President and the U. 
S. Congress to Bring Justice to All Who Were Involved in the Terrorist 
Attack on our Nation on September 11, 2001. 10/1/O1. 

43. Resolution No. 8-02 Authorizing the Submission of an Application to 
the Community Development Block Grant Program: Bonair Enterprise, 
LTD, (A Pella Windows & Doors Distributor). 10/15/01. 



44. Resolution No. 9-02 Community Development Block Grant Program - 
Displacement and Relocation Plan Bonair Enterprise LTD (A Pella 
Windows & Doors Distributor). 10/15/01. 

45. Resolution No. 10-02 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign a Contract 
for Snow Plowing and Removal at Somersworth Plaza. 11/19/01. 

46. Resolution No. 13-02 Renaming a Portion of Elm Street. 11/19/01. 

47. Resolution No. 12-02 Authorizing the City Manager to Sign Extension 
of Contract for the Provision of Emergency Ambulance Service. 
12/10/01. 




10 




Paul N. Vallee, Chief of Department 

The Fire Department wavS extremely busy 
during Fiscal 2000/2001. Our Department 
handled 802 fire incident calls. 

On February 8, 2001, the Department purchased its 
first THERMAL IMAGING CAMERA for $17,500. The funding for this 
camera was made possible by donations from Local and Outside 
Businesses and also Local Residents. 

A comprehensive training session was held on March 23, 24 and 25, 
2001 on the abovementioned Thermal Imaging Camera. In attendance 
were several firefighters from Mutual Aid Communities. The purpose of 
this training session was to provide Level I Practical Structural experience 
to new members and to offer an opportunity for experienced firefighters to 
gain familiarity with the use of the Thermal Imaging Camera. 

October was once again a successful and enjoyable Fire Prevention 
Month. Several hundred pre-school children were given guided tours of 
the Fire Station and shown fire safety videos. Another fire safety program 
called "Officer Phil" was presented to the grade school students and 
faculty as well promoting the many facets of fire safety. This program, 
supported and endorsed by area businesses, targets grades 1 through 4 
at Maple Wood and Hilltop Schools. The students were given fire safety 
coloring books to bring home and discuss with their families. 

Five of our Firefighters, namely Capt. Martin Pepin, Lt. Marc 
Vaillancourt, Lt. Donald Messier, Firefighters Greg Guilmette and Nicholas 
Milinopolous received a Unit Citation at an awards ceremony in Concord 
for rescuing a resident from his burning apartment. 

Firefighter Harry Irwin retired on April 30, 2001, after serving 16 years 
as a full-time firefighter. 

During the course of this year a few of our firefighters left our 
Department to pursue careers with other Departments. As a result of this. 
Firefighter Kenneth Vincent was promoted on May 5, 2001 to the rank of 
Lieutenant. 

The Fire Department is very pleased to have hired Jon Anderson as 
our newest firefighter on June 6, 2001. This position was filled as a result 
of Lt. Donald Messier leaving our Dept. to work for the Windham Fire 
Department as a Deputy Chief. Jon is a Certified Firefighter II, a Certified 
EMTI and Certified in Hazard Material Operations. He resides in 
Somersworth with his wife and children. 



The following incidents occurred during Fiscal Year 2000-2001 
ALARMS RECEIVED: 802 



Days of Week 


Incidents 


Structural 






Sunday 


95 




5 








Monday 


117 




3 








Tuesday 


131 




2 








Wednesday 


111 













Thursday 


115 




2 








Friday 


124 




1 








Saturday 


109 




3 








TOTAL 


802 




16 








Time of Day 


Incidents 


Percent Structural Percent 


07:00 to 18:00 


539 




67% 


8 


50% 


18:00 to 07:00 


263 




33% 


8 


50% 


TOTAL 


802 


100% 


16 


100% 


Type of Situation Found 


FY 




FY 










99/00 


1 


00/01 


Increase 


Decrease 


Structural Fire 




18 




16 




11% 


Outside of Structure Fire 


1 









50% 


Vehicle Fire 




12 




6 




50% 


Non-structural: Brush, Grass 


18 




25 


28% 




Air, Gas Rupture 




2 




4 


100% 




Medical, Rescue, 


Extrication 207 




227 


9% 




Hazardous Conditions 


94 




116 


10% 




Service Calls 




213 




154 




38% 


Good Intent 




85 




81 




5% 


Malicious 




9 




9 






Bomb Scare 




2 









100% 


System Malfunction 


111 




98 




12% 


Unintentional 




57 




65 


12% 




Other 









1 


100% 




TOTAL 




829 




802 




3.3% 


Ignition Factors 










All 




Intentional 










14 




Unintentionals 










5 




Failure of Equipment on Heat Source 




9 




Act of Nature 










1 




Cause Under Investigation 








2 




Cause Undetermined after Investigation 


2 




TOTAL 










33 





12 



Mutual Aid 




Given 


Received 


Air Van 


Barrington 










2 


Berwick 




6 


4 





Dover 




4 


3 


6 


Durham 




1 


1 


1 


Eliot 










1 


Lebanon 










1 


Newington 







1 





Pease 













North Berwick 




2 


1 





Rochester 




4 


3 


5 


Rollinsford 




2 


3 





South Berwick 




2 


1 





TOTAL 




21 


17 


16 


Apparatus Usage 


Number of Responses 




Engine 1 




16 






Engine 2 




722 






Engine 3 




38 






Ladder 1 




26 






Car 2 




41 






Forestry 1 




13 






TOTAL 




856 






Fixed Property Use 


No. of Responses % of Responses 


Public Assembly 




54 




6.7% 


Educational 




29 




3.6% 


Institutional 




8 




9.0% 


Residential 




377 




47.0% 


Store/Office 




85 




10.5% 


Basic Industry/Utility 


8 




9.0% 


Manufacturing 




31 




3.8% 


Storage 




11 




1 .3% 


Special 




158 




19.7% 


Unclassified 




41 




4.9% 


TOTAL 




802 




100% 


Incidents by Shift 


No. of Responses 


% of Responses 


A Shift 


204 




25.4364% 




B Shift 


189 




23.5661% 




C Shift 


213 




26.5586% 




D Shift 


196 




24.4389% 




TOTAL 


802 




100% 





13 



Building Inspections 



Complete 


Annual Inspections 


668 


% of Build 


ings Complied With 


100% 


Violations 


issued 


323 


Violations 


Complied with 


311 


Hours 




203:98 


ar Loss 






Structure 


$107,500.00 




Vehicle 


$9,600.00 




Other 






Total 


$117,100.00 





Partial & Miscellaneous Inspections No. of Inspections 

Partial Misc. Inspections 245 

Reinspections 124 

Total Hours For Inspection 203:98 

Total Hours For Reinspection 27:79 

Total Hours For Partial/Miscellaneous 145:73 

Total Hours 377:50 

Combined Inspections 1,037 

Breakdown of Structure Fires 

Structure Fire, 2 Family Dwelling 

Structure Fire, Group Home 

Washing Machine, 1 Family Dwelling 

Bedroom Fire, 1 Family Dwelling 

Frying Pan, Kitchen, 1 Family Dwelling 

Stove Fire, 3-6 Unit Apartment 

Dryer Fire, Business/Residential 

Clothing Fire, Mercantile/Business 

Microwave (Food) Fire, 2 Family Dwelling 

Stove Fire, Business 

Toaster Fire, 1 Family Dwelling 

Oil Burner Malfunction, 1 Family Dwelling 

Total 14 



14 




T 

The Police Department had another busy year 
in 2001. Important programs were added that 
continues our commitment to the philosophy of 
community policing. 

• We have had a School Resource Officer at 
the High School for a couple of years through 
a grant that paid most of the salary and 
wages. We were very pleased that through a 
3-year, $118,634 grant through the 
Department of Justice, we were able to place a second School 
Resource Officer in the Middle School, as well as the High School. 
Officer Brandon Drysdale was chosen for the position and has 
received specialized School Resource Officer training as well as 
DARE training. In previous years, a Dover officer taught our DARE 
program to our students at the Middle School The continuity of 
seeing the same officer day in and day out throughout the school 
year will build bonds of trust, as well as aid in assuring our children's 
safety in our schools 

Sergeant David Pratt, a 20-year veteran of our department became 
our first Housing Officer. Sgt. Pratt began by visiting with the elderly 
residents of Somersworth and working with the children in our 
Housing Projects. Through a grant that the Somersworth Housing 
Authority was able to obtain through the Eisenhower Foundation, 
The Safe Haven/Mini-Station was created in the heart of the Bartlett 
Avenue Project. Sgt. Pratt has been involved in many activities 
including homework labs, bicycle rodeos, field trips, parades, choirs 
and other activities with the children as well as the elderly. Sgt. Pratt 
now serves the community through his office at the Safe 
Haven/MiniStation and makes regular visits with the Elderly of 
Somersworth. Keep your eye out for the vehicle pictured below. It is 
our Public Housing cruiser (totally refurbished with funds from drug 
seizures). 

From a grant through the State of New Hampshire we were able to 
join forces with Dover and Rollinsford for special patrols to combat 
underage drinking. This grant allows us to conduct special patrols, 
use officers for surveillance at functions where we believe there will 
be underage drinking, conduct sales compliance checks and raise 
awareness of this very serious problem. 



15 



• We also received a local law enforcement block grant from the 
Department of Justice in the amount of $10,313 that will allow us to 
purchase much needed equipment. 

• We obtained funds from the Highway Safety Agency to perform 
traffic enforcement patrols in different areas of our City. 

• We obtained matching funds from the Highway Safety Agency to 
purchase in-cruiser video equipment. This is the second cruiser we 
have equipped with this valuable evidence gathering equipment. 

We continue to receive numerous crime tips on our crime line: 692- 
9111 and our Detective Division email at spdinves(a)ttlc.net. Anyone may 
leave an anonymous tip and all leads are held in the strictest confidence. 



Statistics 

We responded to 14,926 calls for service. This is a 22% increase over 
the previous year. 



2001 City Totals Case Activity Statistics 



Total Offenses Committed: 


3570 


Total Crime Related Incidents: 


2168 


Total Non-Crime Related Incidents: 


2856 


Total Arrests (On View): 


305 


Total Arrests (Based on Incident/Warrants): 


604 


Total Summons Arrests: 


133 


Total Arrests: 


1042 


Total P/C's: 


196 


Total Juvenile Arrests: 


190 


Total Juveniles Handled (Arrest): 


202 


Total Juveniles Referred (Arrest): 


53 


Total Summons 


5 


Total Open Warrants: 


49 


Total Open Default Warrants: 





Total Restraint Orders: 


108 


Stolen Property-Value 


$138,766 


Stolen Property Recovered Value 


$357,141 



16 



Restraint Orders Involving Alcohol 
Restraint Orders Involving Drugs 
Restraint Orders Involving Illness 
Restraint Orders Involving Children 
Crime Incidents Involving Domestic Violence 
Crime Incidents Involving Gang Activity 
Arrests Involving Domestic Violence 
Arrests Involving Gang Activity 

Total Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Total Motor Vehicle Violations-Civil 
Total Motor Vehicle Violations-Warnings 

Total Motor Vehicle Violation-Arrests 

Total Parking Tickets 



Occurrence(s ) Percentage 






0.0 





0.0 





0.0 


3 


0.0 


154 


7.1 





0.2 


109 


10.5 





0.0 


469 




4 




2830 





896 
997 




17 



The Somersworth Recreation & Parks Department has enjoyed 
another wonderful year filled with many new and exciting programs, 
activities, trips and special events. We have continued to offer a diversity 
of programs and activities for all ages and to encourage wholesome and 
healthful use of leisure and recreation within the community. 

Some of the new additions to Recreation Special Events in 2001 
included "Hop Along The Bunny Trail". We created a bunny trail with 
many games and activities along the way, lots of candy and special 
greetings by the Easter Bunny. It was held inside the Middle School from 
6:00-8:00 pm and was enjoyed by over three hundred people. The 
Recreation Department also established "Somersworth Celebrates 
Wellness" which was added to our newsletter as a way to introduce 
nutrition, health and wellness classes for all ages in the community. We 
offered a Senior Walk for Wellness program for 12 weeks in June 2001 , 
which incorporated clinics, walking, breathing techniques, and scenic 
trips. Twelve Seniors participated in this first time program. We also 
offered a variety of Cooking Classes throughout April, May & June 2001. 
They included salads, desserts, international cuisine and cooking with 
herbs. Many adults took advantage of the art of cooking held at the 
Somersworth Vocational Center. 

The Recreation Department held many wonderful programs and 
activities in 2000-2001. We offered a variety of preschool programs that 
continue to be very popular. They include Little Tykes Fun Station, 
Kiddie Kickers, and Pee Wee Basketball. Children's Activities for ages 
6-12 years continues to grow and offer a diverse selection of quality 
programming. These include the after school program. Kids On The 
Move for children in grades 1-4 held from 2:45-5:30 pm at the Hilltop 
Elementary School. This program has offered parents a safe, affordable & 
fun alternative for children after school. The Recreation Department 
offered many Saturday morning programs such as: Basketball, Indoor 
Floor Hockey, Indoor Soccer, Girls Basketball and Youth Soccer. 
Hundreds of enthusiastic children participated in these programs. The 
Teens enjoyed Intramural Floor Hockey and Basketball held Tuesdays 
and Thursdays after school. There were also 5th & 6th Grade Dances 
held at the Flanagan Community Gym that were attended by over 100 
teens regularly. 

There were many summer programs that were well attended. We held 
our Summer Daycamp Program at the Noble Pines Playground Monday 
through Friday from 7:30 am - 5:30 pm for children in grades 1-5. The 



children enjoyed a variety of arts & crafts, theme weeks, sports, games, 
entertainment and field trips. Funshine was held for children ages 3-5 
years old Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at the Noble Pines Park. 
Tennis Lessons were also held at the Noble Pines. Play Soccer Camp 
was held at the High School Soccer Field. Hershey Track & Field had 20 
children, ages 9-14 who participated in track and field events. 

There were many Special Events held by the Recreation Department. 
We held the everpopular Daddy/ Daughter Date Night. Dads and their 
daughters were treated to pizza, treats and bowling on a fun filled Friday 
evening. The Diamond Skills Competition was well attended with girls 
and boys ages 7-14 demonstrating their skills at batting, throwing, and 
base running. The Family Fishing Derby held with Dover Recreation at 
Willand Pond was a huge success with well over 150 children 
participating by casting their reels for fish and prizes! 

The Recreation Department enjoyed some wonderful Family Trips. 
Some of the most popular trips have been; Boston Day Trip, Red Sox 
games, Portland Sea Dogs Game, Christmas Tree Shop trips, Boston 
Pops Concert at the Whittemore Center, Champions On Ice also at the 
Whittemore Center, and Monster Truck Show at the Whittemore Center. 

The Senior Citizens have enjoyed traveling to many fun and 
pleasurable places. We have taken trips to: Amesbury Dinner Theater, 
Seacoast Repertory Theater, Rainforest Cafe, Indianhead Resort for 
the annual Christmas shows and Shamrock Festival, Boothbay Harbor 
Cruise & Lobster bake. Hilltop Steakhouse & Christmas Tree Shop, 
Pickety Place, Rockingham Race Park, and Mt. Washington Cruises. 
The Seniors have also participated in Senior Exercise held at 
Preservation Park, Filion Terrace and Queensbury Mill. The Recreation 
Department has also offered 55 Alive Driver refresher courses for those 
55 and older. 

The Recreation Department has been quite fortunate to have applied 
for and received some funding for Kids On The Move after school 
program through Strafford County Human Services Incentive Funds and 
the Frisbie Memorial Hospital Foundation. The teen summer camp, 
TRENDS also received funds through the Frisbie Memorial Hospital 
Foundation. These funds continue to help us develop and grow and 
ensure the best in quality staff and programming. 

We continue to strive to offer the community quality recreation and 
leisure activities for everyone. If you have any questions, ideas, 
suggestions or comments about programs, activities or trips please share 
them with us. 



19 



We encourage all individuals and families in our community to 
participate in the many recreational opportunities offered through 
activities, programs, special events and trips. 

The Benefits of Recreation are Endless! 

The Recreation Staff 





20 



The Somersworth Housing Authority continues to own and operate the 
following public housing developments, which pay a payment in lieu of 
taxes to the City of Somersworth: 

Albert J. Nadeau Homes, Bartlett Avenue, 56-units of family housing 
R.H. Filion Terrace, Washington Street, 64-units of elderly housing 
Charpentier Apartments, Franklin Street, 49-units of elderly housing 

The Somersworth Housing Authority continues to manage the 
following housing developments, which pay full taxes to the City of 
Somersworth: 

Queensbury Mill Apartments, 24-units of elderly housing 
Preservation Park Apartments, 26-units of elderly housing 
Smokey Hollow Common, 16-units of family housing 
Park View Terrace Apartments, 20-units of elderly housing 

The Somersworth Housing Authority continues to operate the Section 
8 Voucher Program in the City of Somersworth that provides subsidies to 
low income renters to assist them in renting privately owned units in the 
City of Somersworth. We currently provide assistance to 175 households. 

In 2001 the Somersworth Housing Authority expended $282,360 on 
capital improvement projects for its owned units. Funds were expended at 
the R.H. Filion Terrace development on Washington Street to up-grade the 
exteriors of the buildings. This project will be on going until all 17 buildings 
are complete. We also expended funds at the Somersworth Early 
Learning Center, the childcare owned and operated by the Authority, to 
up-grade playground areas for the children. We also constructed a new 
maintenance facility building at the Albert J. Nadeau Homes to 
accommodate an expanding maintenance operation. 

The Somersworth Early Learning Center continues to provide 
childcare to 110 children per day between the ages of six months old and 
twelve years old. We offer a full nutrition program with the childcare as 
well as transportation to and from school. In the summer a full recreation 
program is offered to the children. 

The Martin J. Flanagan Community Center, which was constructed in 
1972, continues to be the main office of the Authority as well as providing 
space for the Head Start Program, which is provided through the Strafford 
County Community Action Program. The facility also provides space for 
the Somersworth Early Education Program, which is a program of the 

21 



Somersworth School Department. The gymnasium at the Flanagan 
Center is busy every day with a varied schedule of activities including 
child, adult and senior programs. 

The Authority also sponsors a Safe Haven/Police Ministation Program 
at the Albert J. Nadeau Homes in partnership with the Somersworth 
Police Department, the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, the State of 
New Hampshire Department of Justice, and PlusTime NH. This program 
is basically aimed at providing an after school homework program for 
development of children between the ages of 6 and 18 years. It is offered 
after school and early evenings in order to provide children with a safe 
place to be during the time when parents have to work. Our goal is to help 
the children succeed in school and to stay out of the criminal justice 
system. A six-week summer program is also offered to the children. 

A Congregate Housing Services Program is offered to frail elderly 
residents who reside at the Charpentier Apartment complex. We provide 
case management, nutrition, housekeeping/homemaker, and 
transportation services to 23 of the 49 apartments in the building. We 
have a full time staff that responds to the needs of these clients Monday 
through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is a program aimed at 
preventing premature institutionalization into nursing homes by providing 
assistance with daily living. 

The Strafford Nutrition/Meals on Wheels Program has been under the 
administration of the Somersworth Housing Authority since 1973 
providing both congregate meals and meals on wheels to the 
communities in Strafford County. Currently the program serves 
approximately 1,800 meals per week to senior citizens and disabled 
persons. Congregate meals are served in Somersworth, Dover, 
Rochester, and Farmington Monday through Friday. Meals on Wheels are 
provided to homebound elderly and disabled persons throughout Strafford 
County Monday through Friday with a provision for weekend meals. 

The Somersworth Housing Authority continues to be the authorized 
agent for the City of Somersworth in all matters relating to Community 
Development programs. The Authority applied for and received a 
$500,000 grant in 2001 with which to upgrade the Franklin and Green 
Street area of Somersworth. Low interest loans were provided to 
homeowners in that area to up-grade properties for the benefit of 
low/moderate income persons in rental and single family properties. The 
Authority was able to renovate 62 units with these funds. The Authority 
continues to apply for community development funds on a yearly basis to 
the State of New Hampshire, Office of State Planning. 



22 



The Somersworth Housing Authority employs 74 people in its various 
programs both full time and part time. It has an annual budget of 
approximately $3,800,000 and owns assets in excess of $8,315,000. 
Since its beginning the Authority has received grants in excess of 
$30,000,000 in federal and state funding. 

Joseph N. Couture David L. Roberge, Chairman 

Executive Director Jean R. Gill, Vice Chairman 

George M. Bald, Commissioner 
Joan A. Lynch, Commissioner 
Teresa Johanson, Commissioner 



23 




WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

The Welfare Department is 
required by state statute to provide 
general assistance to Sonnersworth 
residents who encounter financial 
hardship. The majority of requests 
received are for help with rent, utilities, 
food and medication. Every applicant 
must go through a complete budget 
review to determine areas where expenses might be trimmed and provide 
guidance for future months thereby eliminating the need for further 
assistance. This continues to be the most important part of the application 
process. 

City Welfare works closely with federal, state and local agencies to 
provide "outside" assistance to Somersworth residents. One of our most 
important functions is to refer applicants to programs being offered by the 
other agencies so that the City is not expending funds for services that are 
available elsewhere. In many cases, we provide interim assistance to 
disabled applicants until state and federal programs begin, at which time 
we pursue reimbursement from those programs. The approval process for 
such programs as Social Security, Supplemental Security Income and 
Medicaid can be anywhere from 90 to 180 days, during which the 
applicant may have no means to pay rent, utilities or medications. This 
continues to be our greatest budgetary burden. 

With five year time limits now in place, many families have exhausted 
their TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) benefits through 
the Division of Health and Human Services. Our mission is to ensure that 
these families have the tools in place to support themselves. 

The housing crisis is reflected in rents that have continued to rise in 
the Seacoast area, and the state in general, creating a greater strain on 
working families. The waiting list for state and local subsidized housing 
programs continues to run one to two years. Additionally, all three local 
shelters continue to maintain full capacity. 

The economic pressure of layoffs and closures have been a hardship 
for many families who rely on two incomes to pay their bill's. 
Unemployment benefits may not begin for four to six weeks which 
necessitates City intervention in many cases. 

Home heating costs continue to create hardships to those on fixed 
and minimal incomes. Strafford County Community Action's Fuel 
Assistance Program was available to a greater number of Somersworth 
families and individuals due to expanded program guidelines. The new 

24 



Interim Electric Assistance Program through PSNH now offers electric 
discounts of up to 25 percent to those who meet the income guidelines. 
The proposed deregulation of electric utilities will pose substantial 
challenges to those with poor payment histories in the future. 

The Food Pantry, located at the First Parish Church on West High 
Street, continues to serve residents of Somersworth, Rollinsford and 
Berwick, with both food and household necessities. 

The Welfare Dept. continues to administer a Workfare Program for 
unemployed, able-bodied individuals. Workfare participants are required 
to work a portion of each day in one of the City's departments and search 
for employment when not working. While no wages are paid, the hours 
worked are credited against the assistance rendered by the City. Most 
participants involved in this program are able to secure employment within 
a couple of weeks. 

It is our intent to provide basic assistance to our residents who are 
unable to provide for themselves, refer applicants to other available 
programs, require those who are able to work to find employment, recover 
City expenditures from federal and state programs and require repayment 
arrangements from individuals who are in a financial position to do so. 



Gwen L. Eriey 
Welfare Director 



25 



Forest Glade Cemetery is a very popular walking area with many of 
the City's walkers because of its picturesqueness. We have many people 
who take their daily exercise there. It offers a quiet peaceful place for them 
to unwind. Those who have recently lost a loved one, come to visit often. 
This helps their grief process. We have many visitors coming to look for 
their ancestors. They want to see the place their grandparents, great 
grandparents, etc. are buried and take pictures to bring home and keep 
for future generations. 

In year 2001, we had thirteen burials and installed six foundations for 
markers and monuments. We also repaired sunken markers and graves. 
Pre-need lots were sold. A lot of people are planning where they want to 
be buried and purchasing lots for future needs. We hope to have a crema- 
tion burial area in the near future. 



BULKY WASTE 



How much Solid Waste does Somersworth generate? For fiscal year 
2001 , Somersworth generated 2,065.66 tons of rubbish and bulky waste, 
921 .31 tons of recyclables and 36.9 tons of metal and appliances. As you 
can see, we, the residents of Somersworth, generate a lot of waste. These 
figures do not include the leaf and yard waste that is put in the City's 
compost pile and all the brush that is chipped curbside. 



ADOPT^A^SPOT 



In 2001, twenty-four spots were adopted. With the completion of the 
High St. Construction, High Street looked great last summer. More and 
more businesses are sprucing up their landscaping. Combined with the 
Adopt-a-Spot locations, Somersworth is looking better every year. 




26 




MISSION STATEMENT 

The Somersworth Public Library wilt provide the 
citizens of the City of Somersworth the materials and services necessary 
for their informational educational, and recreational reading needs. The 
Library will actively encourage young children to read and appreciate 
learning. It will also preserve materials needed to provide future 
generations with a record of the history of the city. 

Great progress was made this last year towards the completion of the 
Library's long-term automation project. Over 8 more volunteers were 
trained to add locations to the records on the New Hampshire State 
Library database to create our own database for the library. We thank 
Jerry Lemelin (our first volunteer), Philip Lessard, Jennifer Sakash, Martin 
Canney, Richard Arseneautt, Rose Lemay, Mary Oliver and Candace Yost 
for all their hard work. Each item in the library must have a unique bar 
code, and bar coding the collection also began this year. Jeff Nolin a high 
school student, and Berta Minnick, a long-time volunteer, both worked 
hard and have completed a good portion of the children's room collection. 
Flora White, a Senior Employment Community Employment Program 
employee, joined the library this winter and has worked daily on both 
aspects of this project. Next year, the hardware and software will be 
purchased to bring the database from the NHSL to the Somersworth 
Public Library, when volunteers will add those records not found at the 
State Library, with a projected start of service for the system in 2002- 
2003. 

Several small projects were completed this year to maintain the 
library. A water cooler was installed in July, a drive-up book drop was 
placed by the rear entrance of the building for handicapped accessibility 
to that service, and for the third time since the building was opened in 
1969, the front steps were repaired. The building originally had concrete 
steps, which were capped with granite blocks when they had deteriorated 
in the mid-1 970's due to salt. This year, concrete was poured and leveled 
for a new base for each step to keep the steps secure and without any 
tripping hazards. The metal posts and railings in the main library were 
primed and painted by community service volunteers. 

The picture book collection in the Children's Room has grown by one- 
third in the past ten years. The plastic bins, which contained the original 
collection that moved into the basement space in 1988, had risen from a 
single row to double and then some that were 4 shelves high. It was often 
difficutt, if not impossible to find a specific picture book. Through the 



27 



assistance of the Somersworth Rotary Club and a student volunteer and 
the generosity of two benefactors and the hard work of Mr. Patterson's 
Building Trades Class at the Somersworth Vocational Center, new shelves 
were constructed and installed and all 4,000 picture books transferred 
from the old bins to the new shelves. Please check them out when you 
visit the library. 

The Library's hours were changed for the first time in 10 years. The 
pattern of customer use on Saturdays had staff members pushing 
customers out when we closed at 3:00PM in the fail, winter and spring, 
arid finding that few customers came into the building after lunchtime in 
the summer. We are now open 9AM - 5PM on Saturdays from Labor Day 
through to Memorial Day, and 9AM - 1 PM in June, July and August. 
These Saturday hours match our neighbor library in Dover for both the 
summer and winter, and we match the Rochester Public Library for the 
winter and actually improve on their summer Saturday hours as they are 
closed on Saturdays during the summer. 

As of June 30, 2001, the following statistics were reported for the 
Somersworth Public Library: 

Total Book Collection 47,391 

Children's Book Collection 14,840 

Audio Material Collection 993 

Video Material Collection 851 

Magazine & Newspaper Subscriptions 117 

Number of Items Circulated 55,657 (1,112 on ILL) 

Number of library Cards in Force 5,321 

Total Annual Library Visits 42,796 

Children's Program Attendance 2,368 

Reference Questions Answered 8,216 

Hours Open Weekly 59.5 hours 

The annual Summer Program continues to provide the children of the 
city the opportunity to practice their reading skills learned over the 
previous school year, participate in fun and interesting craft activities and 
programs, and bring families together in a positive experience for the 
summer: Over 150 children signed up for the program in the summer of 
2000, titled "It's Reading Cats & Dogs". 

The Board of Trustees of the Somersworth Public library began an 
exploration of long-range planning this past year. Several meetings have 
been spent on pre-planning, with decisions made about how the process 
would be done, the start of goal-setting by the Board, and a preliminary 
survey of library customers completed. The planning wilt continue into 
2001-2002. The Board welcomes the public to attend their monthly 
meetings, held in the library office at 7 PM the first Tuesday of each month 
excepting July and December. 

28 



STAFF 

Debora Longo, Library Director 
Nancy Polito, Children's Librarian 
Kathleen Dill, Library Assistant 
Trudy Grant, Circulation Assistant 
Eliza Warfield, Circulation Assistant 
Laura Melisi Page 
Barbara Ashworth, Page 
Linda Wheeler, Page 



TRUSTEES 

Thomas Tetreault, Chairperson 
Gregory Bailey 
Ellen Dozier 
Pamela Landry 
Joan McNally 




Library steps under renovation 



The new steps all set for the 
next season of sand and salt 




New shelves in the Children's Room 
built by the Building Trades class of the Somersworth Vocational Center 



29 




The City's Administrative Code 
defines Somersworth's city government 
by operational departments. As stated in 
the Code, the Department of Develop- 
ment Services shall be responsible for 
the Divisions of Economic Develop- 
ment and Planning, and the Offices of Assessing, and Code Enforce- 
ment. The various missions of each are also spelled out in the Adminis- 
trative Code. They include the following: 

• The Division of Economic Development and Planning shall provide 
land use & economic growth planning services to all City Depart- 
ments and Boards; and recommend changes in land use and other 
regulations to provide harmonious and economical growth for the 
City. 

• The Office of Assessing shall maintain a complete roll of the ap- 
praised value of property and improvements of the City; and main- 
tain all assessment and tax rolls as required by state law or City 
ordinance. 

• The Office of Code Enforcement shall receive applications and issue 
permits for the construction and renovation of structures under the 
City's building code; and, with the assistance of the City Planner, 
interpret the zoning ordinance and other land use regulations and 
enforce the building code, zoning ordinance and related land use 
regulations. 

In accordance with these goals, the Department of Development 
Services, along with the dedicated service of individuals serving on the 
City's various land use boards, continues to promote development that 
ensures Somersworth growth as a premier place to live and conduct 
business. 

PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

The 2000-2001 fiscal year was marked by a slowing economy that 
eventually turned into a recession. The economy continued to slide in the 
wake of the September 11, 2001 tragedy. However, most economists now 
predict an economic turnaround by mid-2002. In the meantime the gen- 
eral economy poses a challenge for Somersworth and its neighbors 
before a recovery gets underway. It is anticipated that New Hampshire will 
be the first of the New England States to recover. The New Hampshire 
advantage being founded in its strong communities and quality of life. 



30 



Development that occurred within the City over the last year included 
the following new and expanded business projects: 

• Aroma Joe's Coffee: drive-thru coffee - 422 Route 108 

• AutoZone Store: auto parts facility - 503 High Street 

• The Frisbee Foundation - Medical facility - 353 High Street 

• High Street Professional Offices- offices - 388 High Street 

• Kohlhase: renovation to electrical supply & storage facility - 302 
Main Street 

• NADCO: industrial expansion - Willard Drive 

• Rehab 3 Athletic Center: medical facility- 237 Route 108 

• Seacoast Vascular Center, LLC: medical facility - Route 108 

• R.D. Sedgewick: industrial office/storage expansion - Route 108 

• Somersworth Health Center: medical facility - 85 Main St., 
Somersworth Plaza 

• Sumner Printing: industrial expansion - 433 Route 108 

• Tri-City Bingo, LLC: renovation - 451 High Street 

in addition to these, new residential construction activity remained 
high. The total number of new living units constructed in 2001 was 39. 
There were also 22 new single-family homes built during the year. The 
total estimated construction cost taking place during the 2001 calendar 
year was $8,825,236. The building permits issued for these construction 
projects generated $41 ,660 in general fund revenues for the City. 

MAJOR INITIATIVES FOR THE YEAR 

During the past year the City completed the reconstruction of a 1 .5- 
mile section of High Street. The road was widened from two (2) lanes to 
four (4). The $7 million dollar project included the replacement of existing 
utilities and the upgrade and signaling of several intersections. The City 
continued to focus on the development of an exit 10 from the Spaulding 
Turnpike to the City of Somersworth. The State of NH Department of 
Transportation has selected a preferred alternative, which involves the 
upgrade of NH Rte 108 through Somersworth and the building of a new 
corridor; know as the B-1 (b) corridor, which would join West High Street 
with the Spaulding Turnpike via Interstate Drive in Somersworth. The next 
step in the development process is to complete the Environmental Impact 
Statement and take the project to a final public hearing. 

The City and the Somersworth Housing Authority hired Civil Consult- 
ants to conduct a feasibility study for the creation of a community center 
for the City of Somersworth. The goals of the study were to develop 
criteria that could be used to determine the needs of the City, the location 
of the facility, select viable options, and to evaluate those options. The 
VFW building and the Flanagan Center were identified as sites for consid- 
eration. 



31 



Through a Seacoast Metropolitan Planning Organization local techni- 
cal assistance grant the City's Department of Development Services 
commissioned Strafford Regional Planning Commission (SRPC) to con- 
duct a one-way traffic study for the downtown area. SRPC evaluated a 
counter clockwise one-way alternative of traffic flow along the downtown 
corridor. Traffic and infrastructure issues were examined and evaluated 
and presented in a report to an adhoc committee of the City. The study 
provided a conceptual framework and a point of departure for a future 
engineering effort that would be required to accomplish the tasks outlined 
in the report. 

Various amendments to the City's Zoning Ordinance were proposed 
by the City's Planning Board and adopted by the City Council, which 
included Manufactured Housing District regulations, changes to the Flood 
Plain District regulations, and two (2) new zoning districts, R1A and 
Historic Moderate Density (HMD), for the Hilltop area. 

The City continues to enforce its Property Maintenance Code. Cur- 
rently there are nine major codes that are enforced on a regular day-by- 
day basis (BOCA building, BOCA fire prevention, International plumbing, 
International mechanical, International private sewage, International fuel 
gas, CABO one and two family. National electrical code, and BOCA 
property maintenance code). 

The City completed renovations to the Somersworth Plaza facade and 
parking lot. The new City Hall at One Government Way was completed 
and City administrative staff opened their offices to the community for 
business on Monday, January 7, 2002. 

CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENT - BUILDING INSPECTOR 

The year 2001 brought many new, exciting and attractive businesses 
to the City. Overall, it was an extraordinary year of development for the 
City of Somersworth. We saw the old Great Falls School that was aban- 
doned for so long revitalized with 16 new upper scale apartments and all 
new exterior landscaping. The old Dover Shoe warehouse was sold after 
many years of inactivity and is making its transformation into a large multi- 
use business facility. American Velcro took occupancy of their enormous 
facility on State Route 108 (a wonderful neighbor to have). Three new 
medical facilities were finished and three more are works in progress. 
Staples and AutoZone are complete and add greatly to convenient retail 
businesses. Many new houses were constructed and sold in the Turgeon 
development on Cornfield Drive. The oldest home in Somersworth at 5 
Prospect Street was totally renovated, keeping its historical features. 
Interesting pictures are on display in the Code Enforcement Department. 



32 



Property maintenance was amplified greatly by public awareness. 
Currently approximately 400 structures have been addressed and most 
were given a well-needed face-lift. We hope the public has noticed the 
changes. Here are some statistics of Code Enforcement activity: 

510 permits were issued in total -the highest amount on record. 

257 were building permits. 162 were electrical permits. 

55 were plumbing permits. 27 were mechanical permits. 

4 were demolition permits. 5 were septic repair permits. 

Construction included 39-new residential units, 6-new commercial 
buildings, and 8-major commercial renovations. There were also 1,250- 
building and property inspections performed. 

OFFICE OF ASSESSING 

The City Assessing Office falls under rules and regulations promul- 
gated by the State of New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administra- 
tion (NH DRA). Through recent legislation DRA has assigned State 
property appraisers to work with cities and towns to assure compliance in 
meeting DRA property valuation certification standards. DRA has also set 
a 4-year schedule to complete this process with all NH cities and towns. 
Somersworth is scheduled for certification by the NH DRA in the year 
2004. 

State guidelines require that property valuations must meet 5 main 
criteria to be certified. Properties must fall between 90-110% of true value. 
Property values must have a maximum of 5% variation among classes of 
property. Municipal assessing records must be kept in a clear and accu- 
rate fashion. All assessing practices must comply with State Law, and 
finally, exemptions and credits must be applied fairly. 

As a practical matter the real estate market in New Hampshire has 
seen some significant peaks and valleys over the past decade or two. 
What most property owners will find when they look at recently sold 
properties in their neighborhoods is a 30-50% higher market sale price 
than current City assessments for that property. It has been our goal to 
keep all properties at 100% of true market value insofar as it is possible. 
As such, Somersworth has attempted to make necessary and proper 
adjustments to property values every 2 years since 1992. This better 
assures the City of Somersworth is assessing properties proportionally so 
that each property owner pays its fair share. 

As we move forward, our approach will remain pretty much the same 
as it has been. We believe it will both serve the community better as well 
as ensure State requirements are met. This approach includes: 

33 



• Scheduling a Citywide revaluation update for April 1, 2002. These 
new property values will be reflected in your May-2002 property tax 
bills. 

• Using the remaining time before the certification process in 2004 as 
a working schedule to make any necessary adjustments. Our office 
will continue to be proactive in addressing any concerns raised by 
property owners. We appreciate your assistance in bringing your 
concerns to our attention. 

FOR THE FUTURE 

In his inaugural address on January 8, 2002 Mayor James M. McLin 
identified several major initiatives for the City of Somersworth. These 
included renovations of the Hilltop School, the relocation or remodeling of 
the City's Police Department building, and pursuit for the City's inclusion 
into the 2002 New Hampshire Main Street Program. The Mayor asked the 
Council and Community to unite behind these projects in an effort to keep 
the City moving forward and to continue to make Somersworth the best 
kept secret in the New Hampshire Seacoast. 

City Manager Douglas R. Elliott, Jr. identified additional direction for 
the City in a January 2002 interview with the local press. As well as those 
listed by Mayor McLin, Elliott listed securing exit 10 off the Spaulding 
Turnpike, City Library renovations, and development of the 80-acre Gara- 
bedian property off Route 108. To expand recreational opportunities for 
the community. City Manager Elliott pointed to a re-examination of a 
proposal to lease city land to investors for use as a golf course and con- 
sideration of a plan for a new municipal pool. 

In December, the Main Street Program initiative began. Early commu- 
nity support has been centered in the belief that it can be the catalyst for 
further revitalization efforts of Somersworth's Downtown District. It would 
seem to reason that this program could continue the City's momentum by 
linking its work to the new City Hall and Somersworth Plaza projects. In 
the City's Letter of Intent to apply for the New Hampshire Main Street 
Program it is noted, "The entire Somersworth Community can be enriched 
and energized by the many attractive facets and smart planning features 
of Main Street Program". 

Perhaps, the City's slogan says it best -. "Proud past, bright future." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Department of Development Services 

Robert M. Belmore, Director 
Sheila Gowen, Planning Secretary Carroll Seigars, Building Inspector 

Jack Kenyon, Code Enforcement Officer Jamie Steffen, Planner 

Kerrie McCarthy, Development Services Clerk Shirley White, Assessor 



34 



Detail Schedule of Revenues and Other Financing Sources 

Budget and Actual - General Fund 

For the Year Ended June 30, 2001 - Schedule A-1 



Revenues 

Taxes 

Property taxes 
Resident taxes 
Interest, penalties and ottier taxes 

Total Taxes 

Licenses, Permits and Fees 
Motor vehicle permits and fees 
Dog licenses 

Business licenses, permits 
and fees 

Total Licenses, Permits and Fees 

Intergovernmental 
City: 

Stnared revenues 
Higtiway block grant 
Railroad tax 
Landfill grant 
Business profit tax 
Payment in lieu of taxes 

Sub-total City Intergovernmental 

School: 

State adequacy grant 

Medicaid reimbursement 

Building aid 

Catastrophic aid 

Kindergarten aid 

Tuition 

Vocational aid - Transportation 

Other 

Sub-total School Intergovernmental 

Total Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 

Income from departments 
Hydro lease 

Total Charges for Services 

Interest Income 

Other Revenues 
Insurance refunds 
Sale of town property 
Miscellaneous 

Total Other Revenues 

Other Financing Sources 
Use of fund balance 

Total Revenues and Other 
Financing Sources 



Budget 



878,853 



60,000 



450,000 



874,171 



$ 20,323,121 



25,417 



450,000 



$ 20,697,936 



Variance 

Favorable 

(Unfavorable) 



10,747.918 

70,000 

181,000 


$ 10,747,918 

70,790 

136,569 


$ 

790 
(44,431) 


10,998,918 


10,955,277 


(43,641) 


1.070,240 
5.000 


1,268,007 
9,494 


197,767 
4.494 


50,000 


82.151 


32,151 


1,125,240 


1.359,652 


234,412 



268,611 


268.611 




166,659 


173.131 


6,472 


2.000 


2.235 


235 


22.235 


6,406 


(15,829) 


392.348 


392,348 




27.000 


31,440 


4,440 



(4,682) 



4.865.760 


4,865,760 


- 


199.959 


142,370 


(57,589) 


220.771 


220,921 


150 


197,675 


192,329 


(5,346) 


93,750 


87,750 


(6,000) 


730.725 


870,709 


139.984 


64,870 


62,191 


(2.679) 


1,600 


7 


(1,593) 


6,375,110 


6,442,037 


66,927 


7,253.963 


7,316.208 


62,245 


i 210.000 


$ 240,552 


$ 30,552 


25.000 


86,809 


61,809 


235,000 


327,361 


92,361 


200,000 


264,021 


64,021 


45,000 


8,588 


(36,412) 


15,000 


11,650 


(3,350) 


- 


5,179 


5,179 



(34,583) 



$ 374.815 



35 



Detail Schedule of Expenditures and Other Financing Uses 

Budget and Actual - General Fund 

For the Year Ended June 30, 2001 - Schedule A-2 



Budget 



Actual 



Variance 

Favorable 

(Unfavorable) 



Expenditures 



General Government 
Mayor/council 
City manager 
City clerk 
Elections 
Assessing 
Finance 
Tax collector 
Administration 
Planning and zoning 
Economic development 
Municipal building 
Civic promotions 

Total General Government 

Public Safety 

Police administration 

Police patrol 

Investigation 

Police support 

Traffic 

Prosecution 

Fire administration 

Firefighting 

Total Public Safety 



30.277 


$ 27.584 


$ 2,693 


142,443 


142.443 


- 


93.004 


93.003 


1 


14.105 


13,050 


1,055 


76.925 


76,422 


503 


161,523 


161,523 


- 


112,728 


110,771 


1,957 


128,000 


128,000 


- 


196.509 


193.014 


3,495 


38,750 


36,346 


2,404 


61,910 


61,899 


11 


32.200 


32.167 


33 


1.088,374 


1,076.222 


12,152 


243.939 


242.193 


1.746 


858.100 


858.100 


- 


170.930 


170,565 


365 


159.952 


159.952 


- 


35,150 


34,540 


610 


63.156 


62.318 


838 


103,515 


98,169 


5,346 


710.907 


703,374 


7,533 


2.345,649 


2,329,211 


16,438 



36 



Detail Schedule of Expenditures and Other Financing Uses 

Budget and Actual - General Fund 

For the Year Ended June 30, 2001 - Schedule A-2 (Continued) 



Highways and Streets 
Engineering 
DPW administration 
Snow removal 
Street maintenance 
Street cleaning 
Drains 

Equipment acquisition 
Equipment maintenance 
Solid waste collection 
Street lights 
Buildings and grounds 
Code enforcement 
Cemetery 

Total Highways and Streets 

Health and Welfare 
Health 
Welfare 

Total Health and Welfare 







Variance 






Favorable 


Budqet 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


77,599 


$ 77,598 


$ 1 


369,003 


368,614 


389 


165,217 


164,674 


543 


222,222 


222,220 


2 


21,706 


21,705 


1 


45,524 


45,524 


- 


79,800 


79,559 


241 


81,289 


80,512 


777 


146,564 


140,856 


5.708 


94,000 


84,510 


9.490 


40,160 


36,211 


3.949 


84,952 


83.550 


1.402 


21,548 


10,983 


10,565 


1.449,584 


1,416.516 


33.068 


44,330 


36,330 


8,000 


174,450 


172,430 


2.020 



218.780 



208.760 



10,020 



Culture and Recreation 








Public library 


211,496 


207,629 


3,867 


Recreation 


154,675 


153,210 


1,465 


Total Culture and Recreation 


366.171 


360,839 


5,332 


School Department 


11.982.924 


11,879,479 


103,445 



Debt Service 

City 

Principal 
Interest 

School 
Principal 
Interest 



Total Debt Service 

Intergovernmental Assessment - County 

Other Financing Uses 
Transfers (out) 

Total Expenditures and 
Other Financing Uses 



442.176 


$ 442.174 


$ 2 


166.678 


166.663 


15 


567,400 


567,400 


. 


385.278 


384,289 


989 


1.561.532 


1.560.526 


1.006 


875,107 


875.107 


- 



435.000 



$ 20.323.121 



435.000 



$ 20.141.660 



$ 181.461 



37 



Enterprise Funds 

Combining Schedule of Revenues, Expenses, Budget and Actual 

For the Year Ended June 30, 2001 - Schedule E-3 



Water Fund 



Budget 



Actual 

(Budgetary 

Basis) 



Variance 

Favorable 

(Unfavorable) 



Operating Revenues: 
Fees and miscellaneous 



$ 916.796 



$ 1.019.610 



$ 102.814 



Total Operating Revenues 



916.796 



1.019.610 



102.814 



Operating Expenses: 
Sewer expenses 
Water expenses 
Solid waste operations 
Distribution 

General and administrative 
Debt service 
Miscellaneous 



378,411 

100,537 

180,208 

135,000 

86,736 



337.546 

137.357 
193.896 
135.000 
110.671 



40.865 

(36,820) 
(13.688) 

(23.935) 



Total Operating Expenses 



880.892 



914.470 



(33.578) 



Nonoperating Income and (Expenses): 



State grants 

Interest income 

Interest expense 

Loss on disposal of fixed assets 


49.884 

10.000 

(95,788) 


46.157 

9,989 

(73.326) 

(1.794) 

(18.974) 


(3.727) 
(11) 
22.462 
(1.794) 


Total Nonoperating Income and 
(Expenses) 


(35.904) 


16.930 


Net Income (Loss) Before 
Operating Transfers 


- 


86,166 


86.166 


Operating Transfers: 
Transfers (out) 








Net Income (Loss) 


$ 


$ 86.166 


$ 86.166 



38 



Schedule E-3 (Continued) 





Sewer Fund 






Solid Waste 






Actual 


Variance 




Actual 


Variance 




(Budgetary 


Favorable 




(Budgetary 


Favorable 


Budqet 


Basis) 


(Unfavorable) 


Budqet 


Basis) 


(Unfavorable) 


$ 832.114 


$ 1.055.213 


$ 223,099 


$ 300.000 


$ 270,573 


$ (29,427) 


832,114 


1,055,213 


223,099 


300.000 


270,573 


(29,427) 



648,850 



599.115 



49,735 



300,000 



257.308 



42,692 



33.010 


33,010 


63.924 


63,924 


12.500 


14,657 



758,284 



710,706 



(2.157) 



47,578 



300.000 



257,308 



42.692 



47.505 
(21.335) 



47,505 

(16.344) 
(1,406) 



4,991 
(1,406) 



26.170 



29.755 



3,585 



100.000 



374.262 



274,262 



13,265 



13,265 



(100.000) 



(100.000) 



$ 274,262 $ 274,262 



$ 13,265 $ 13,265 



39 



St 



iomersworth Pumpkin Festival 




Photo courtesy of Nancy Liebson 



40 



City of Somersworth 



Service Directory 




Adopt-A-Spot Program 692-4266 

Auto Registration 692-9555 

Betterment Assessments 692-9555 

Birth/Marriage/Death Certificates 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Blocked Storm Drains 692-4266 

Building Permits and Inspections 692-9522 

Compost Facility 692-4266 

Council Agenda Information 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Dog Licenses 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Elections/Voter Registration 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Emergency Welfare Assistance 692-9509 

Historical Reference Questions 692-4587 

Library Information 692-4587 

Marriage Licenses 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Museum Pass Reservations 692-4587 

Pay Per Bags / Bulky Waste Stickers 692-9511 or 692-9512 

Police 692-3131 

Road Repairs 692-4266 

Property Maintenance Inspections 692-9521 

Property Taxes 692-9555 

Recycling Info 692-4266 

Resident Taxes 692-9555 

Service Agency Referrals 692-9509 

Sewer Backups 692-4266 

Snow Ban Info 692-9131 

Street Light Problems 692-4266 

Traffic Light Problems .692-4266 

Trash Info 692-4266 

Water Main Breaks 692-9523 

Water / Sewer Bills 692-9523 

Water / Sewer Payments 692-9555